How to Create a RACI Kids’ Ministry

Responsible - Accountable - Consulted - Informed


by Mark Entzminger/ January 26, 2015

Building a RACI kids’ ministry is a great way to equip volunteers and create accountability. Earlier this week, I shared a few reasons embracing the RACI model of leadership can improve our effectiveness in ministry [The Most Effective Kids’ Ministries are "RACI”]. Today, I wanted to take it a step further and explain how you can implement it within your ministry. Here’s a look at how it can help you define roles and responsibilities in your ministry:

 

 

 

Family / Discipleship Pastor

Children’s Minister

Children’s Ministry Coordinator

Volunteer Leader #1

Volunteer Leader #2

Sunday Morning (Large Group)

I

RA

C

S

 

Sunday Morning

(Small Group)

I

A

R

S

 

Wednesday Night Service

I

RA

C

 

S

Outreach Event

I

A

C

R

S

  

The left column lists various activities. At your church this might be boys’ clubs, girls’ clubs, Sunday school, Bible Drill, or VBS. The vertical columns are identified by various roles. Within your ministry this might be coordinator, children’s minister, pastor, or volunteer support. By drafting the RACI chart, you can see a clear visual of the various programs and roles for each. (In the above chart “S” signifies support.)


How to create a RACI kids’ ministry

Here are three steps you can take to develop a RACI leadership model for your ministry:

Step 1. Define all of the activities within your children’s ministry. Plot them out on the chart. Be sure to include aspects of ministry that may at first seem like they are within the same category. The more categories created, the better for organization purposes.

Step 2. Resolve Overlaps. Every process in a role responsibility map should contain one and only one “R” to indicate a unique process owner. For example, you might have multiple small group leaders who are “responsible.” In the case of more than one “R”, there is a need to “zoom in” and further detail the subprocesses associated with “obtain resource commitment.” This will separate the individual responsibilities.

Step 3. Resolve Gaps. Where no role is identified that is “responsible” for a process, the individual with the authority for role definition must determine which existing role is responsible or if a new role is required, update the RACI map, and clarify with the individual(s) that assume that role.

The RACI chart clearly shows who is responsible for each program while also showing where the leadership gaps exist. As you start filling out the chart, you might notice positions that need to be filled. Instead of being on a constant search for new volunteers, this is a great opportunity for you to define your most pressing ministry needs and look for people with specific gifts and passions for stepping into those roles.

Are you familiar with the RACI approach? Have you discovered some gaps in your ministry’s leadership structure?