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Developing a Healthy Relationship with Your Lead Pastor

The relationship we have with our lead pastor is one of the most vital ones we will have in ministry. If the relationship with your lead pastor is unhealthy, it will have a significate impact on your ministry. So, what does it take to develop and maintain a healthy relationship with your lead pastor? Well, at least four things.


Questions Your Pastor May Want Answers To

The demands of being a lead pastor in a local church leave little capacity to truly understand the health of every ministry in the church. So how do you help solve that? How do you build a bridge of communication and information?


Maintaining a Healthy Relationship with Your Lead Pastor

Brain Dollar (the children’s pastor, who has served as a kids’ pastor since 1992), and Rod Loy (the lead pastor) share about their years of working together and explore ways of building a strong relationship with the one God has called you to work beside.


The Legacy I Want to Leave

Do you ever wonder what the person who replaces you in ministry will do differently? It’s kind of a scary and sobering thought all at the same time. I’ve watched a number of ministry transitions take place over the years. Some of them have been successful; others have caused the ministry to flounder and never recover. So what would I want my successor to know about what I felt was important in shaping children’s ministry? I thought you would never ask…


What I Wish Parents Knew About Children’s Ministry

Children’s ministry is not just about kids, it’s about families. It’s about helping families to understand that the church is established to pastor and teach the family as a whole. There are three things that I wish parents would understand about children’s ministry:


The One Thing I Wish The Church Board Knew About Kidmin

Most children’s ministries across the country have two things in common: they need one more worker and a bigger budget! (If you don’t have those two problems, either your church is a phenomenal exception or your vision is too small—but that’s a different blog post.)