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<em>6 Children's Ministry Essentials</em> Book Review

This book consists of a selection of blog posts from My Health Church Kids written by 29 different authors, divided into six categories, and transformed into a quick-access guide for Kidmin pastors and leaders.


After the Quizzing Ends

The JBQ quizzing season is over, and the National JBQ Festival has come and gone. Teams have put away their quiz boxes for the summer and are waiting to restart in the fall. For the sixth graders, their JBQ career is over. Some will move on to TBQ [Teen Bible Quiz] while others get involved in other church, school, and/or athletic activities. So now what?


AGKidMin17 Conference

The national KidMin17 conference was held April 19-21 at First Assembly in Ft. Wayne, Ind., with over 1,000 kids’ pastors and children’s leaders attending. The following is an overview provided by Danielle Christy, one of the conference attendees.


<em>Framework Leadership</em> Book Review

Framework Leadership by Kent Ingle gives us the building blocks that any leader needs to have. Ingle has taken a mountain of leadership theory from multiple sources and boiled it down to quick, easy-to-read, and understandable bites.


How Churches Grow Young

Multiple studies highlight that 40 to 50 percent of youth group seniors—like the young people in your church—drift from God and the faith community after they graduate from high school. Kara Powell, Jake Mulder, and Brad Griffin cite this statistic at the outset of their new book, "Growing Young." The statistic alarmed me both because I am a minister concerned about trends that affect the church and also because I am a father concerned about the faith journeys of my own children. If you share my concerns, I encourage you to read this book, which outlines “6 essential strategies to help young people discover and love your church,” as the book’s subtitle puts it.


3 Steps Toward Achieving Goals

Do you remember the parable of the servants and the talents in Matthew 25:14-30? Three servants were each entrusted with different quantities of gold before the master departed on a long trip. Upon the master’s arrival, the first servant doubled his original five bags of gold and presented the master with 10 bags. The second servant gave his master four bags of gold instead of the original two, while the last servant presented the same single bag, proud that he did not lose it. The point of this parable is to use what we are given and use it well.