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Inside Out the book review

In a world where the type of leader we are defines us, it is important we seek to become the best leader we can be—a servant leader. In their book "Inside Out," Rich and Robyn Wilkerson perfectly balance the concept of a simple read with maximum effectiveness on servant leadership and what this principle can look like. Servant leadership is defined as being somebody who responds to needs, who forms and manages partnerships to meet those needs, and who prays. When these actions are broken down, we discover the characteristics of a servant leader. "Inside Out" lists these 15 characteristics of servant leadership.


The Unfiltered Generation

Children today are being born and raised into a technologically advanced society. While this has its advantages, it also has its dangers. Access to misinformation can cause confusion, magnify insecurities, and even damage a child’s frail and formidable mind. This article focuses on four aspects that parents and/or leaders can focus on as they encourage children.


Mentoring Boys into Future Men

Many children’s ministries leaders know that incorporating learning styles and age-appropriate activities allow them to better disciple children. Research now bears out that when the gender of the child and the unique needs of that gender are factored into the programming and discipleship approaches by those ministries, they can have an even higher level of effectiveness. This article highlights the top four needs of a 4-year-old boy and how focusing on those needs through the lens of his gender can greatly increase the effectiveness of our discipleship to him.


3 Keys for Great Small-Group Discussions

Kids learn best by talking, asking questions, and interacting with each other. So one of the best strategies you can use in your ministry is to incorporate small-group discussion. This article provides three key tips for facilitating small-group discussion.


Keeping JBQ Practice Fun and Engaging

Each year we start off our JBQ season reminding parents of our number-one goal for their children: We want them to have fun! Some may say this goal is not appropriate. It could be said a better goal would be for kids to have God’s Word hidden in their hearts or to have a team do well in competition. I contend, though, that if kids are having fun, both things will happen naturally.


Tips for JBQ Coaches and Parents

Tony Dungy, coach of the Indianapolis Colts and Super Bowl Champions, wanted to win but was more interested in his players succeeding in life after football. We need to be that way with JBQ. The real win will be 10 or 20 years from now, when we see the children we coached or parented doing awesome things for God. Let's raise up some faithful men and women for God!